Mexican Grand Prix Facts

If you love Formula 1 racing, maybe you’ve always dreamed of watching a race
somewhere hot and exotic. The Mexican Grand Prix fits the bill perfectly and has
taken place at the Autodromo Hermanos Rodriguez in Mexico City a grand total of
19 times since 1963. After more than 20 years of not hosting the race, the Mexican
Grand Prix returned to the F1 racing calendar in 2015. For your own once-in-a-
lifetime trackside experiences, visit the Mexico F1 Paddock Club with
edgeglobalevents.com/f1-paddock-club/f1-paddock-club-mexico/
The History of the Mexican Grand Prix
The very first Mexican race took place in 1962 where it was staged at the new
Magdalena Mixhuca circuit in Mexico City. The park also hosted events like
basketball, field hockey, track cycling and fencing for the Summer Olympics of 1968.
By 1963, the circuit became part of the Formula 1 Championship. However, it
wouldn’t be long before the Mexican race lost its place on the F1 calendar mostly
due to its incredible popularity. The organisers felt they could not control the
hundreds of thousands of spectators causing a safety issue for drivers. The last race
until 2015 happened in 1970 and was won by Ferrari team driver Jacky Ickx.

To help with safety, the circuit was partly redesigned and given a new name – the
Autodromo Hermanos Rodriguez. It was named after two local racing brothers who
both died in racing accidents – Pedro and Ricardo Rodriguez. It briefly returned to
the F1 calendar in 1986 and was a favourite with drivers, particularly the nerve-
wracking final corner named Peraltada. Sadly, the track fell out of favour once again
as organisers couldn’t fund the improvements needed to keep the track up to date.
Fast forward to 2015 and the Grand Prix once again returned to the Autodromo
Hermanos Rodriguez. The circuit had been redesigned with the main alteration being
a slow-speed section near the stadium which effectively halved the perilous final
Peraltada corner. Each race is a sell-out and it’s very well supported by local fans as
well as international ones.
Mexican Grand Prix Fact File
The Autodromo Hermanos Rodriguez is the highest track on the F1 calendar at
2,240m above sea level. At the other end of the spectrum, the lowest track is the Yas
Marina circuit in Abu Dhabi and the Sochi Autodrom which both lie less than 1m
above sea level.

The driver Jim Clark is the only driver to complete a ‘Grand Slam’ at the Mexican
track in 1963. He took pole position, the quickest lap and won the race.
It was at the 1986 Mexican Grand Prix that driver Gerhard Berger had his first of 10
Grand Prix wins. He achieved this incredible success in a Benetton B186 and won
the Mexican race on just one set of Pirelli tyres.
The last turn on the newly designed circuit was renamed after British racing driver
Nigel Mansell in 2015 after winning the race twice in both 1987 and 1992.